Argentine Remington Rolling Block Photos & Notations

(Information and photos from Sr. Eduardo Fontenla; with my deep appreciation!
Please visit his website at:   Fontenla & Fontenla:  Fierros, armas históricas, recargas, guns, ammunition
I also received this excellent letter:

Subj:  M1866/75 Argentine Remington
Date: 01-03-22 14:32:44 EST
From: eahull@earthlink.net (Edward Hull)
Reply-to: eahull@earthlink.net
To: KeithDoyon@MilitaryRifles(.)com

Hi Keith-

    Saw your update on the "M1866/75 Argentine Remington" rifle.  The excellent photo of the breech/frame, sans forestock, clearly shows that the frame is/was of the type used on the Rem. .58 cal. "transformation" or breechloader conversion muskets. If the breech block is concave (to fit under the barrel) then it is a pre-1871 made frame.  If the breech block is flat and the barrel bottom is cut to accept the block, the it is post-1871 type.  Note that there was a hole at the front of the trigger guard where the original sling swivel was attached--in the later alteration it was plugged and the swivel added to the buttstock. The fact that it has the long trigger guard tang with the screw is further indication that it is the conversion frame, as is the style of breech block.

    Given the rebarrel in Belgium, I wonder if this isn't a surplus French (Franco-Prussian War) frame? It could certainly be of the mid 1870 time period--or much later. Since the Argentines imported all kinds of "surplus" (US CW as well as from other sources) it isn't unusual that such a rifle would end up there. But proving that it is an "official model" or issue arm might be a bit more difficult.
    Keep up the good work.

Ed Hull

NOTE: Edward L. Hull is the author of Providence Tool Company Military Arms, Santa Rosa Printing, Milton Florida, 1978, 1979, an EXCELLENT  treatise on the Peabody and Peabody-Martini military rifles, Peabody conversions, Roberts conversions and the fascinating company that made them.  Profusely illustrated.  Highly recommended

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For comparison to a rifle with almost identical (and identically placed) markings see also the photos of the Liege built M1868 Egyptian Remington Rolling Block.
 

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Above:  Photo by Sr. Eduardo Fontenl

Below are two receiver photos of what I believed to be a Mosquetón de Caballería sistema Remington 1866/75 (Cavalry Musket Remington System M1866/75).

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The breech block is not channeled like the "Belgian" block in the Fontenla photo, above, but please note that the channel is identical to the Egyptian Model Remington, including those assembled in Liege see photos of the Liege built M1868 Egyptian Remington Rolling Block. Rather, the breech block  is flat like the "American" block, although it has the older style screw retained extractor.

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Above:  Photo by Sr. Eduardo Fontenla of the M1879 Patricia Remington Rolling Block, below of the Mosquetón de Caballería sistema Remington 1866/75 (Cavalry Musket Remington System M1866/75).

Below is a close-up of the upper tang of a rifle that I believe to be a Mosquetón de Caballería sistema Remington 1866/75 (Cavalry Musket Remington System M1866/75).  Patent information is identical.

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Above photo, upper rifle:  What I believed to be a Mosquetón de Caballería sistema Remington 1866/75 (Cavalry Musket Remington System M1866/75).  Above Photo, lower rifle:  The "regular" commony seen 1879 Modello Argentino.

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Remington Patent date markings on the lower sling swivel:  "PATDEED D. 18, 1868"
How these were assembled on these guns with Liege-made barrels I have no idea!!

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Above:  Photo by Sr. Eduardo Fontenla
Anyone know for sure?  (Or an informed guess at least???)

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Note the presence of Werndls in Argentina.  This strengthens my belief regarding why the "M1879 Modelo Argentino" is fitted with what are essentially Werndl back sights!! see:  Distinguishing Characteristics of the M1879 Argentine Remington Rolling Block.

Page built September 25, 1999
Revised:  Oct 25,  2021