M1871,  M1878 & M1881 Swiss Vetterli Stutzers:
 
 

Immediately above and below:  M1871 Stutzer.
Note the double set trigger.  (from my friend Eduardo's collection)

Generally:  The "Stutzer" short rifles are a series of double set-trigger rifles which Switzerland adopted to supplement its regular infantry rifle.  Stutzers were adopted as M1867 Milbank-Amsler rifles as well as the later Vetterli Stutzer Rifles discussed right here.  The Stutzers were adopted to arm the "riflemen" as distinguished from the general infantry.  Troops in more of a "sharpshooter" role.  Only 16,000 were built.
 

Distinguishing Charecteristics:  The M1871 Stutzer was shorter than the corresponding M1869 and M1869/71 Swiss Vetterlis but retains the early quadrant sight and forestock checkering.  Note that it has only one barrel band and nosecap, a deeply curved heavy buttplate, which was adopted generally for the infantry rifles with the M1878 Swiss Vetterli, and the unusual Thury double set-trigger.  Look for the two trigger levers within the triggerguard.

    The M1878 Stutzer is a much closer approximation of the standard M1878 Vetterli Infantry rifle and is only slightly modified, distinguished from the M1878 rifle by the Schmidt type double set-trigger.  Like the Model 1871 Stutzer, above, look for the two trigger levers within the triggerguard.  Fewer than 6,000 were built.

    The M1881 Stutzer is, like the M1878 a much closer approximation of the standard M1881 Vetterli Infantry rifle.  The Schmidt type double set-trigger is slightly improved internally but without obvious external differences.  The backsight is the improved Schmidt Quadrantenvisier graduated fro from 225-1,200 meters on the external left side, but containing an additional sliding leaf to extend the range to 1,600 meters.  Like the Models 1871 and 1878 Stutzers, above, look for the two trigger levers within the triggerguard.
 
 
 


 

Page built May 8, 2000